LEPIDOPTERA LIFE CYCLES VOL. 1: Actias luna

The Luna Moth (Actias luna) is one of the most spectacular of the giant Saturniid moths from the United States. With its green colors and long delicate tails, it is breathtaking to see live and in person, especially for the first time! According to the amazing book “The Wild Silk Moths of North America: A Natural History of the Saturniidae of the United States and Canada” by Paul M. Tuskes, James P. Tuttle and Michael M. Collins, this species can be found throughout most of the eastern part of North America. There are two seasonal forms, with those hatching in the spring being a more intense green in color whereas those hatching in the summer tend to be more yellowish. The spring forms also have a more vibrant purple outer wing margin. I have found them very easy to rear on both walnut and sweetgum, with the only real issues being overcrowding which tends to attract yellow jackets and birds, who love to eat the caterpillars, especially when using net bags on the branches of trees.

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The Thrill of the Hunt: Finding Moth Cocoons in the Wild

For anyone that raises butterflies and moths, having your caterpillars form pupae is a huge undertaking. You spend weeks feeding these hungry mouths and though you may be doing it in protected environments, the chance of failure is still there. Stink bugs, yellow jackets, skunks and raccoons are always hungry for your babies and at times, no matter how hard you try, they still seem to find what you are working so hard to protect. There is an excitement that is unequaled when your caterpillars finally form their chrysalis or cocoon. With all of these odds against you in captivity, what chance do they have in the wild?

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BOOK REVIEW: “Moths And How To Rear Them” by Paul Villiard

When it comes to nature books, there are few that remain relevant forever. As new research is done using modern technology, information that was taught just a few years ago can quickly become obsolete. This is particularly true when it comes to books on insects as new discoveries are made almost daily.

When it comes to raising, or rearing, butterflies and moths, a fun hobby that all children should experience at least once in their lifetime, new and better techniques are being learned and taught and if you are hoping to be successful, these techniques should be kept up with.

In 1980 I was in the 8th grade and our graduation trip was to the Boston Museum of Science in Boston, Massachusetts. Though I had a great time in the museum, it was the book that I took home with me that day from the gift shop that forever changed my life. It was Paul Villiard’s “Moths And How To Rear Them.”

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Original 1969 hardcover edition of this must-have book!

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BOOK REVIEW: “Butterflies and Moths: A Guide to the More Common American Species”

Some classics just never go out of style. Such is the case for the book “Butterflies and Moths: A Guide to the More Common American Species” by Robert T. Mitchell and Herbert S. Zim. Most field guides eventually go out of print and become unavailable over time as their information becomes outdated and new guides are produced. To my knowledge, this book has been in continuous print since it originally came out in 1964.

SCAN0001The original library hardcover version of this classic book!

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LARVAL FOODPLANTS OF SATURNIID MOTHS OF THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

Raising Lepidoptera has been a hobby that I have enjoyed ever since I was a kid. Though raising butterflies has always been fun, it is raising the giant silkmoths, family Saturniidae, that has been my favorite aspect of rearing. Thankfully I live in an area that includes a great representation of these amazing moths, even though their wild populations do seem to be dwindling with each passing year. What I present to you is a list of the most commonly used caterpillar foodplants for these moths representing nine species. This list is in no way meant to be complete and only through experimentation can new plants be added to this ever-growing list.

So, if you have never raised Saturniid larvae before, or even if you are a seasoned veteran, this list will hopefully be helpful in guaranteeing your success! Good luck and have fun!

THE LUNA MOTH – Actias luna

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Aspen (Populus), Bayberry (Myrica), Beech (Fagus), Birch (Betula), Butternut (Juglans), Chestnut (Castanaea), Hickory (Carya), Hops (Humulus), Hornbeam (Carpinus), Maple (Acer), Oak (Quercus), Pecan (Carya), Sweetgum (Liquidambar), Sycamore (Platanus), Tulip Tree (Liriodendron), Walnut (Juglans).

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