SPECIES SPOTLIGHT: Brachypelma albiceps, the Mexican Golden Red Rump

I may have mentioned it before; Brachypelma is my favorite genus of tarantulas. They have everything going for them. They are long-lived, have amazing colors and for the most part, don’t have an aggressive bone in their body. Brachypelma albiceps is also one of my favorites, as it seems to be the odd man out when it comes to coloration.

Juvenile just starting to show adult colors.
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SPECIES SPOTLIGHT: Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens, the Green-Bottle Blue

I love that when I discuss tarantulas with people who do not keep them, how amazed they are that some species are actually beautiful. In my experience, the majority of the people that I talk to think tarantulas are big, brown, hairy spiders. I am guessing that they think of Goliath bird-eaters as what all tarantulas look like. How wrong they can be.

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SPECIES SPOTLIGHT: Acanthoscurria geniculata, the Giant White Knee

When it comes to collecting tarantulas, each person has their own preferences. For me, I prefer New World species over Old World (see my blog Old World Vs. New World Tarantulas). For this species spotlight I am here to discuss Acanthoscurria geniculata, the Giant White Knee, a bird-eating tarantulas from Brazil.

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BUGGY BOOK REVIEW: “The Tarantula Gallery: Image Reference & Species Accounts” by Danny de Bruyne

It’s been awhile since a new book came out on tarantulas and “The Tarantula Gallery: Image Reference & Species Accounts” is one not to be missed! I had not seen anything on this book until I did a recent, random search on Amazon and it came up. When it comes to tarantula books I am a completist so ordered it right away.

This is the first in a series of tarantula books with 50 Tarantula Species Accounts/50 Tarantula Care Guides in each volume. “The Tarantula Gallery” is a beautiful compilation of photographs and basic husbandry information compiled by avid South African tarantula hobbyist and tarantula breeder, Danny de Bruyne. A quick-reference for what each species looks like, listing basic requirements and suggestions to provide them with a comfortable enclosure in captivity.

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CASE STUDY: Saturniidae Moth Populations in Richmond, Rhode Island Part 3

This is going to be a quick entry in this case study. As of this writing on June 27, 2021, all but a few cocoons have hatched. I have a small assortment still of cecropia, polyphemus and luna. Initially I felt that this case study was a failure about after giving it some thought, I realized that I know a lot more now than I did at the start, which should help tremendously going into 2022.

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CASE STUDY: Saturniidae Moth Populations in Richmond, Rhode Island Part 2

Cocoons and pupae I was able to obtain prior to this study were Actias luna, Hyalophora cecropia, Antheraea polyphemus, Samia cynthia and Citheronia regalis. On the last two species, I did not have high hopes of drawing in males attracted to hatched gravid females, but thought that perhaps, living so close to Connecticut, that I may be pleasantly surprised.

Citheronia regalis.
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My first book! “Do You Remember…?: A Trip Down Memory Lane for You and Your Family”

Just recently I had published my first book, one designed to help us get through the state of the world today. We all have memories; some good, some bad. We tend to want to forget the bad and cherish the good, but with our busy lifestyles it has become more and more difficult to remember. We work all day, coming home exhausted. We get caught up using technology instead of spending quality time with our loved ones. We just never seem to have a moment to just relax and think.

Once in awhile we may have a sudden flash of a memory and you ask yourself “What made me think of that?” This book helps you go beyond the sudden flash and prompts you to make the time, sit down and think back…and remember. What was your favorite Christmas gift? What was your favorite Halloween costume? Who was your favorite teacher? This and so many other questions are provided with space to write out your answers. What do you do with these answers? Appreciate them. Share them with your family. Ask your friends for their answers. Though this book is about you, it can definitely be shared on so many levels.

If you need a break with the monotony of the world, then this book can help! Ordering is easy! Just click on the book cover below! Thank you for your support.

~David Albaugh

My visit to the May Natural History Museum

Since I was seven years old, I have been fascinated with insects, especially butterflies and moths. Growing up I did have an insect collection. I would collect and mount them on pins in glass cases. As I got older though I began to appreciate the very same insects being alive. It got to a point where collecting insects no longer mattered to me, despite the importance of these collections. These days I would prefer my entomological work to be raising and releasing local butterfly and moth species, and photographing the progress.

I will never fault anyone who has and insect collection. It is in fact a very rewarding hobby. It’s just not for me, even though I do enjoy looking at other peoples’ collections. The collection at the May Natural History Museum is one such collection that I was able to ooooh and ahhhh about in 2016.

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CASE STUDY: Saturniidae Moth Populations in Richmond, Rhode Island Part 1

When it comes to insects, butterflies and moths have always been my favorite type. Nothing beats a warm summer day sitting outside, watching butterflies visit your flowers. As much as I enjoy this though, it is the giant silk moths that fly at night that I am passionate about the most.

Newly hatched Callosamia promethea female.
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BUGGY BOOK REVIEW: “Outstanding Birdwing Butterflies” by Gilles Deslisle and Jean-Pierre Sclavo

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When I became aware of this book, I became excited immediately. Birdwing butterflies have always been my favorite type of Lepidoptera, both for their amazing colors and their size. Though I am a fan of both D’Abrera’s book “Birdwing Butterflies of the World” and the series of books “A Monograph of the Birdwing Butterflies” by J. Haugum and A.M. Low, it seemed, sight-unseen, that this release would be the ultimate guide to these incredible insects.

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